Combine your expertise in science, psychology, and sociology to study one of the fastest growing populations in Canada.

 

 

By 2030, almost one-quarter of Canadians will be senior citizens. This demographic will require specialized services that will change the medical, housing, and societal landscapes of our country as we know it.

 

At Huntington University, the Gerontology program integrates biology, psychology, sociology, and other areas of expertise, such as, communications, counselling, end-of-life care, and human sexuality.

 

As a graduate of the Gerontology program, you’ll enter the workforce knowing:

 

  • Social, psychological, and biological theories in gerontology
  • The differences between abnormal and normal age-related changes.
  • The consequences of these changes on the individual’s ability to interact with their physical and social environments.
  • Key changes in social roles, social supports, and policies related to aging.
  • The diversity of ethnicity, culture, gender, and sexuality within the aging population in Canada.
  • The ethics of research and the significance of quantitative and qualitative research.
  • Contribution of research to knowledge in gerontology.

 

Ontario Secondary School Applicants:

 

  • 1 grade 12 English U/M course
  • 5 other grade 12 U/M courses 
  • a minimum overall average of 70% in the 6 best grade 12 U/M courses

 

 

 

Additional information for applicants who have completed Advanced Placement courses.

 

Additional information for applicants who have completed the International Baccalaureate.

 

Other Applicants:

 

Students may be admitted with advanced standing from college and/or university programs. In such cases, they may consult with the Chair of the department of Gerontology once admitted to advise on course selection.

 

Additional information for applicants, including international students, mature students and out-of-provice students can be found here.

BACHELOR OF ARTS (3 YEAR) IN GERONTOLOGY

Total 90 credits

 

Students must follow these regulations in order to meet graduation requirements for the BA or B.Sc.

 

CONCENTRATION IN GERONTOLOGY

 

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations.

 

GERO 1016E - Introduction to Gerontology I: Understanding Aging Today
GERO 1017E - Introduction to Gerontology II: Caring For the Elderly in Canada

GERO 2016E - Optimal Aging I

GERO 2017E - Optimal Aging II

GERO 3016E - Critical Skills for the Gerontologist I

GERO 3017E - Critical Skills for the Gerontologist II

GERO 3107E - Internship in Gerontology

 

15 credits of Gerontology electives
 
Note: Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.
 

BACHELOR OF ARTS (4 YEAR) IN GERONTOLOGY

Total 120 credits

 

Students must follow these regulations in order to meet graduation requirements for the BA or B.Sc.

 

SPECIALIZATION IN GERONTOLOGY

 

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations.

 

GERO 1016E - Introduction to Gerontology I: Understanding Aging Today
GERO 1017E - Introduction to Gerontology II: Caring For the Elderly in Canada
GERO 2016E - Optimal Aging I

GERO 2017E - Optimal Aging II

GERO 3016E - Critical Skills for the Gerontologist I

GERO 3017E - Critical Skills for the Gerontologist II

GERO 3107E - Internship in Gerontology

GERO 3126E - Applied Research Methods in Gerontology I

GERO 3127E - Applied Research Methods in Gerontology II

 
21 credits of Gerontology electives 

 

Option A – THESIS STREAM

 

GERO 4015E Thesis and 2 of the following courses (total of 6 credits):

 GERO 4301 - Seminar Course

GERO 4236 - Aging and Human Physical activity
GERO 4206 - Analysing Public Policy for Canada's Diverse Aging Population
GERO 4257 - Gerosex II
GERO 4306 - Service Delivery of Long-Term Care

GERO 4096 - Directed Studies

 

Option B – COURSE STREAM

 

4 of the following courses (total of 12 credits):

 

GERO 4301 -  Seminar Course
GERO 4236 - Aging and Human Physical activity
GERO 4206 - Analysing Public Policy for Canada's Diverse Aging Population
GERO 4257 - Gerosex II
GERO 4306 - Service Delivery of Long-Term Care

GERO 4096 - Directed Studies

 

Note: Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.

 

MAJOR IN GERONTOLOGY

 

All students entering a BA program as of September 2017 are required to take 6 credits each of linguistic awareness, scientific literacy and indigenous content as per the regulations.

 

GERO 1016E - Introduction to Gerontology I: Understanding Aging Today

GERO 1017E - Introduction to Gerontology II: Caring For the Elderly in Canada

GERO 2016E - Optimal Aging I

GERO 2017E - Optimal Aging II

GERO 3016E - Critical Skills for the Gerontologist I

GERO 3017E - Critical Skills for the Gerontologist II

GERO 3107E - Internship in Gerontology

GERO 3126E - Applied Research Methods in Gerontology I

GERO 3127E - Applied Research Methods in Gerontology II

 

1 of the following courses:

GERO 3306 - Dementia Studies

GERO 3326 - Food and Nutrition
GERO 3327 - Ethical Issues for the Elderly

 

4 of the following courses:

GERO 4301 - Seminar Course
GERO 4236 - Aging and Human Physical activity
GERO 4206 - Analysing Public Policy for Canada's Diverse Aging Population
GERO 4257 - Gerosex II
GERO 4306 - Service Delivery of Long-Term Care

 

Notes:
  • Students must complete a minimum of a minor (24 credits) or a second major (42 credits) from among their elective credits.
  • Students may not exceed 42 credits at the 1000 or 9100 level in their degree program.

 

MINOR IN GERONTOLOGY

 

GERO 1016E - Introduction to Gerontology I: Understanding Aging Today

GERO 1017E - Introduction to Gerontology II: Caring For the Elderly in Canada

 

12 credits of GERO, at least 6 of which must be at the 3000 or 4000 level
6 credits from the list of electives

 

CERTIFICATE IN GERONTOLOGY

The Certificate is only available to students not pursuing a degree in Gerontology

 

GERO 1016E        Introduction to Gerontology I: Understanding Aging Today

GERO 1017E        Introduction to Gerontology II: Caring For the Elderly in Canada

GERO 2016E        Optimal Aging I

GERO 2017E        Optimal Aging II

 

18 credits from the list of electives

Please note that courses listed are subject to change and may not be offered every term.

 

*Denotes a course that is available via online learning.  

 


 

*GERO 1016: Introduction to Gerontology I: Understanding Aging Today 
This course introduces the subject of aging as it is found in the Canadian context. Starting with a demographic analysis of Canada's aging population as well as a discussion of ageism and the marginalization of the elderly, the course will examine why we age, what impact aging has on the person and how we attempt to adapt to aging in our relationships and lifestyles. Most importantly, the course will attempt to develop a positive understanding of being old, as an opportunity for creating new meaning and for cultivating the force of character. (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 1016 and GERO 1015.

 

*GERO 1017: Introduction to Gerontology II: Caring For the Elderly in Canada 
This course will examine the various ways the elderly are supported and cared for in Canada. Health care, long-term care, kinship, social policy, housing and transportation, leisure, and spirituality are topics that are covered as they relate to the elderly. As well, the course will familiarize students with possible careers in the field of applied Gerontology. (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 1017 and GERO 1015.

 

*GERO 2016: Optimal Aging I 
This course outlines optimal aging in terms of historical, cultural, psychological, physical, and personality theories or perspectives of aging. Emphasis will be made on recognizing older adults as a heterogeneous population that is entitled to supportive environments. (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 2016 and GERO 2015.

 

*GERO 2017: Optimal Aging II 
This course studies optimal aging in greater detail in terms of productivity, spirituality, social theories, social supports, sexuality, and end-of-life issues. Emphasis is placed on recognizing caregiving and supportive environments in association with aging. PREREQ: 18 university credits (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 2017 and GERO 2015.

 

GERO 2206: Men & Aging
This course examines the dynamics of aging from a male perspective. Issues men face as they age, such as their physical, mental, emotional, spiritual and cultural wellbeing, are discussed. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

GERO 2207: Public Policy for Culturally Diverse Populations
This course explores public policies that impact on Canada's aging population.  Topics include the historical context of major public health policies, how policies are made in Canada , current public policies, programs, and services related to health, health determinants and culturally diverse older adults.  PREREQ: 18 university credits (lec 3) cr 3.  Students many not retain credit for GERO 2207 and GERO 4206. 

 

*GERO 2226: End-of-Life Care with Older Adults 
A review of the history and current practices for end-of-life care (palliative care, hospice care) establishes the context of this course. Students learn about the physical, mental and spiritual concerns of older adults as these older adults face their own death or the death of a loved one. Strategies for meeting these concerns are discussed in terms of non-medical, physical, mental and spiritual comfort. Additional discussion topics include: family dynamics at the end of life, advanced directives, funeral rites, body disposal, bereavement care and working in a multidisciplinary care environment. The method of instruction involves lectures, films and guest speakers. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

GERO 2236: Fit for Life: Physical Activity and Aging

This course explores the dynamic between physical fitness and overall well-being in later life. Experiential learning through in-class physical activity (tai chi, stretching, yoga, dance, or other forms of movement) fosters reflection on course concepts. Fitness, well-being, and functional capacity of older adults; physical and psycho-social effects of short and long-term exercise on older adults; assessment of and strategies for age-appropriate physical activity; and Masters athletes.  PREREQ: 18 university credits (exp / lec3) cr3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 2236 and GERO 4236 or PHED 4236.

 

GERO 2246: Art Therapy & Aging
This course introduces students to the use of art therapy with older adults. The history of art therapy as a therapeutic modality and current trends in the field will be critically examined as they relate to the field of gerontology. Client/ patient assessment and the identification of therapeutic goals will also be addressed. Relevant factors such as dementia, end of life issues, the effects of stroke (eg aphasia), physical disability, loss/grief, and family dynamics will be explored as they relate to art therapy. The concepts of "best practice", "the reflective practitioner", confidentiality, and ethical considerations will be examined throughout the course with respect to working with older persons. The inclusion of case studies, role play and art therapy experientials will provide students with opportunities to critically examine and apply relevant therapeutic skills. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

*GERO 2257: Gerosex I
This course addresses sexuality in later life, including how the biological changes of aging impact on sexuality and health. Issues related to sexually transmitted infections are also addressed, as well as the unique needs and challenges of gay and lesbian older adults. (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 2257 and GERO 4257.

 

*GERO 3016: Critical Skills for the Gerontologist I 
This course addresses critical skills for the gerontologist. Topics- include managing continuity and change with seniors, policy analysis and development, demographics/epidemiological analysis, professionalism and code of ethics, and end-of-life legal and ethical issues. PREREQ: 18 university credits. (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 3016 and GERO 3015.

 

*GERO 3017: Critical Skills for the Gerontologist II 
This course addresses interpersonal communication with seniors, behavioral concerns, case assessment, program evaluation, proposal and report writing and advocacy. PREREQ:18 university credits. (lec 3) cr 3

 

*GERO 3106: Counselling Older Adults 
The course provides approaches to gerontological counselling. The focus is on the Canadian context enriched by considerations of other cultural perspectives and worldviews. Topics include the counselor role and the counselling process,; the major theoretical orientations used in counselling older adults, and the development of counselling skills. PREREQ:18 university credits or permission of the Chair. (Lec 3) Cr 3

 

*GERO 3107: Internship in Gerontology 
An introduction to the practice of gerontology through an internship experience in the community. Students work within settings such as a centre for seniors, a seniors' focused program within an agency, or in a seniors' care facility or residence. The course provides both practical experience and the opportunity for reflection and criticism of gerontological theory. PREREQ: GERO 1015 and GERO 3106. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

*GERO 3126: Applied Research Methods in Gerontology I
This course provides students with theoretical knowledge and methodological skills necessary to conduct applied research in the field of Gerontology. PREREQ: STAT 2126 and either PSYC 2127 or SOCI 2127. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

GERO 3127: Applied Research Methods in Gerontology II
This course is a continuation of GERO 3126, with an emphasis on conducting research in the field of Gerontology and will familiarize students with the issues of seniors and how these might relate especially to rural and northern areas in Canada. As a group, students will be required to conduct an applied research project under the supervision of the course instructor. Participants will design a survey questionnaire, collect and analyze data using SPSS and write a final report. PREREQ: GERO 3126. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

*GERO 3206: Ethnogerontology 
This course examines aging in Canada from an ethnic perspective. Topics include the family and community, the life course, death and dying, health, and economics, as well as theory and methodology in ethnogerontology. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

GERO 3207: Health Challenges in Aging
Designed as an elective for students in all disciplines, this course examines perceptions of aging held by the elderly, family, health professionals and community; physical and psycho-social changes; health, health promotion and maintenance, and healthcare policy in relation to quality of life. Students have contact with healthy elderly persons in the community. Class time includes lectures, the use of case studies and student presentations. In seminars, the multidisciplinary group, from its diverse experiences, identifies the issues arising from the interplay between the elderly and society at large. (lec 1.5, tut 1.5) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 3207 and NURS 3107.

 

*GERO 3216: The Aging Body 
This course examines the aging of the human body from a broad biological perspective. It explores the impact of aging on changes associated with tissues, cells, and sub-cellular components. PREREQ: 18 university credits or permission from the Chair. (lec 3) cr 3 

 

GERO 3301: Clinical Gerontology I
An introduction to the concept of the clinical gerontology practitioner as an agent of change. The basic skills of attending and responding are developed. The student learns to demonstrate respect, warmth and genuineness in a one-to-one clinical relationship. The ability to enter the other's frame of reference is practiced and the process of learning how to counsel in different settings is experienced. The student becomes involved in self-examination as a way of defining one's own personal philosophy or praxis, and is invited to explore the values, beliefs, attitudes and behaviours that impact on the development of helping skills. PREREQ: GERO 1016/7, GERO 2016/7 and GERO 3106. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

GERO 3302: Clinical Gerontology II
A continuation of GERO 3301, with the addition of new core concepts of facilitative self-disclosure, advanced empathy, immediacy and confrontation. Effective helpers are committed to understanding clients as well as the ways in which they experience themselves and the world in general. Effective helpers invite clients to challenge themselves so as to examine new perspectives and to set realistic goals and then act on them. A variety of communication skills are used by helpers to accomplish these tasks including information sharing, empathy, helper self-disclosure, immediacy and principles of effective challenging. The process of challenging others requires self-confrontation and further exploration of one's personal life philosophy. Once again, the learner is asked to explore her/his personal values, beliefs, attitudes and behaviours that impact on the development of helping skills. PREREQ: GERO 3301. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

*GERO 3306: Dementia Studies 
This course familiarizes students with various forms of dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease. Methods of caring for dementia patients, both outside and inside institutional settings, are examined. Students are required to assist in the care of a dementia patient. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

GERO 3307: Music Therapy & Aging
This course outlines the principles of music therapy and their application to the geriatric and Alzheimer/dementia populations for musicians and non-musicians. (lec 2, exp 1) cr 3. Crosslisted with MUSC 3207. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 3307 and MUSC 3207.

 

*GERO 3326: Food & Nutrition in Later Life 
This course addresses concepts of nutrition, nutrients, changing nutrition requirements of the aging adult, the health consequences of malnutrition, and, nutritional remediation of physiological pathologies associated with the elderly. Prerequisites: 18 university credit or permission from the Chair. (lec 3) cr 3.

 

GERO 3327: Mental Health & Aging
This course explores psychiatric disorders common in later life. Students will also be introduced to interventions related to these diseases (i.e. psychopharmacology, behaviour therapy). At the end of the course, students will be able to assess a patient and to discuss possible interventions with a qualified psychiatrist. (lec 3) cr 3.


SUMMER COURSE ! Earn 3 cr. in this one-week condensed course! 


GERO 3806: Special Topics in Gerontology – Older Workers: Adaptations and Accomodations to Illness and Injury – Register Today!

 

This course addresses a selected topic in gerontology. Topics may vary from year to year. 


Prerequisites: 18 university credits. (lec/sem 3) /cr. 3

 

Professor: Behdin Nowrouzi-Kia
Summer: August 26 – 30, 2019
Times: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Type: On Campus (room HU-SC)

 

Older Workers: Adaptations and Accomodations to Illness and Injury introduces the topic of work and older adults. Learners will gain insight about older adults in the Canadian labour market through various pedagogical activities. Using clinical cases, students will gain insight on how to engage with stakeholders to develop return to work plans for older adult workers with a variety of illnesses or injuries in various organizational contexts, including both union and non-union settings. Learners will apply concepts and strategies from conflict resolution and problem-solving to learn to build collaborative relationships with all parties to facilitate early and timely return to work for employees following a leave of absence. Emphasis will be placed on the health and functioning of older adults through a biopsychosocial lens.


 

GERO 4096: Directed Studies
This course consists of directed readings in a particular area of interest in the field of Gerontology.  The work is supervised by a faculty member.  PREREQ: 18 credits in GERO on permission of the department  (sem 3) cr. 3

 

*GERO 4206: Public Policy for a Culturally Diverse Aging Population

This course analyses public policies that impact on Canada's aging population. The course explores the historical context and the political process for health policy development. A policy analysis triangle is applied to investigate current policies, programs, and services related to health and cultural diverse older adults. Students cannot attain credit for GERO 2207 and GERO 4206. Prereq. 30 university credits or permission from the Chair. (lec/sem 3) cr 3

 

GERO 4236: Fit for Life: Analysis of Physical Activity and Aging 
This course analyses the dynamic between physical fitness and overall well-being in later life. Experiential learning through in-class physical activity (tai chi, stretching, yoga, dance, or other forms of movement) fosters reflection on course concepts. Fitness, well-being, and functional capacity of older adults; physical and psycho-social effects of short and long-term exercise on older adults; assessment of and strategies for age-appropriate physical activity to support activities of daily living; and Masters athletes are analysed. (Prerequisites 18 credits in gerontology or permission of the department. (exp / lec3) cr3. Students may not retain credit for GERO 4236 and GERO 2236 or PHED 4236

 

*GERO 4257: Gerosex II
The course critically assesses sexual and reproductive changes in older adults. Emphasis is placed on research on sexual health concerns and dysfunctions in later life as well as care management options. Prereq: 30 university credits or permission of the Chair. (lec 3) cr 3. Students may not retain credit for both GERO 4257 and GERO 2257.

 

GERO 4301: Seminar

This seminar course addresses current debates in the field of aging.  Topics may vary from year to year.  Students conduct academic research and literature review, which they will reflect upon using Gerontological perspectives and theories.  Emphasis will be placed on analyses of concepts and controversies in the study of aging.  (lec 3) cr 3

 

GERO 4306: Service Delivery in Long-Term Care

 This course covers service delivery of long-term care in the context of current social structures.  The complexities of the healthcare system are examined as well as the political processes and legislation that impact on the delivery of long-term care.  Discussion includes the administrative issues and trends in the provision of services to culturally diverse clients and conditions in both community and institutional environments.  (lec 3) cr 3

Gerontology Pool of Electives

 

Please note that courses listed are subject to change and may not be offered every term.

 


ANTR 2016E

Human Biological Variation, Adaptations and Health    

ANTR 2136E

Workplace Culture

ANTR 3046E Public Health and Epidemiology
ACCT 1001E Understanding and Using Financial Information
COST 2606E The Decorated Body As Communication
COST 2446E/RLST 2446E The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication I 
COST 2447E/RLST 2447E The Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication II
COST 3127E Communication Research
GERO 2206E    Men and Aging  
GERO 2207E Public Policy
GERO 2226E End-of-Life: Care With Older Adults
GERO 2236E Fit for Life
GERO 2246E Art Therapy and Aging
GERO 2257E Gerosex I
GERO 3106E Counselling with Older Adults 1
GERO 3206E Ethnogerontology
GERO  3207E Health Challenges in Aging
GERO 3216E The Aging Body 
GERO 3301E Clinical Gerontology I
GERO 3302E Clinical Gerontology II
GERO 3306E Dementia Studies 
GERO 3307E/MUSC 3207E Music Therapy in Aging 
GERO 3315E/RLST 3315E Life Journeys: Transitios, Rites of Passage, and Spirituality 
GERO 3326E Food and Nutrition in Later Life 
GERO 3327E Mental Health and Aging
GERO 3336E/RLST 3326E Religion and the Elderly
GERO 3337E/RLST 3327E Ethical Issues and the Elderly
GERO 3806E Special Topics in Gerontology
GERO 4206E Health Policy Analysis
GERO 4236E Physical Activity and Aging
GERO 4257E Gerosex II
GERO 4301E Seminar
GERO 4306E Service Delivery of Long-Term Care 
INDG 3256E Aboriginal Health and Wellness
RLST 3336E Food, Ritual and Religion
SOCI 2036E Family Sociology I
SOCI 3817E Sociology of Aging 
SWLF 2106E Political Economy of Social Welfare
SWLF 2107E Human Service Organizations
WGSX 2357E Women and Aging
WGSX 2456E Women's Health Issues


Students entering Huntington University’s Gerontology program from specific college programs may achieve advanced standing of up to 42 credits towards their degree in Gerontology. Agreements with the following colleges & programs are currently in place:

 

Cambrian College:

  • Developmental Services Worker
  • Social Service Worker

 

Canadore College:

  • Dental Hygiene
  • Practical Nursing
  • Mental Health & Addiction Worker
  • Recreation Therapy
  • Social Service Worker

 

Fanshawe College:

  • Social Service Worker

 

George Brown College:

  • Activation Coordinator/Gerontology

 

Georgian College:

  • Dental Hygiene
  • Practical Nursing
  • Developmental Service Worker
  • Social Service Worker

 

Sault College:

  • Fitness & Health Promotion
  • Practical Nursing
  • Occupational Therapy Assistant
  • Physiotherapy Assistant
  • Social Service Worker
  • Social Service Worker – Native Specialization

 

St. Lawrence College:

  • Social Service Worker
Head Shot of Dr. Lorraine Mercer, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Gerontology at Huntington University
Dr. Lorraine Mercer
Department Chair / Associate Professor
705 673 4126 ext. 209
Room 129
[email protected]